Tuesday, 15 September 2009

The Seven Dolours of Our Lady...

This morning started badly - the shower attachment on my bath taps gave up the ghost in most spectacular fashion, resulting in my bathroom floor being completely awash, while my hair wasn't. Not wanting to be late for work, I decided to deal with it all when I got home...

So, after a fairly hectic day, I abandoned the pile of books waiting to be marked, and high-tailed it out of school in order to get to one of my local shops which sells householdy-type things. Being home much earlier than usual, I washed my hair, stuck something prepackaged in the microwave, and settled down in front of the computer for a quick browse through the blogs.

Patricius has a beautifully reflective post on the Stabat Mater, in which he mentioned that his favourite version was the one by Aniero. I checked the (small) collection of classical CDs in my possession, and then went on to You Tube in the hopes of finding it there, but no joy. Instead, I found the following version by Palestrina...


I used to have a Rosary of the Seven Dolours: I acquired it soon after I returned to the Faith, seventeen years ago (I don't remember the exact date, but it was some time in September: the 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C to be precise... this meant that the Gospel was the one which read "There is more rejoicing in heaven over one repentant sinner..." and, having just been reconciled to the Church, I sat and sobbed through the sermon. Very moving!) I was drawn to Traddy devotions and prayers before I actually realised that they were Traddy.

Anyway, the Seven Dolours Rosary (or chaplet, actually) consists of seven groups each of seven beads, separated by seven medals, one for each of Our Lady's seven sorrows. There are also three extra beads, representing the tears shed by Our Lady at the foot of the Cross, and a medal of Our Lady of Sorrows.

The seven sorrows of Our Lady are:

1. The prophecy of Simeon.
2. The flight into Egypt.
3. The loss of the Child Jesus in the Temple.
4. Mary meets Jesus carrying His cross.
5. The Death of Jesus
6. Mary received the body of Jesus from the cross
7. The body of Jesus is placed in a tomb.

2 comments:

PatterNoster said...

'Traddy' devotions are not traddy. They're Catholic.

Mac McLernon said...

Of course: but they are dismissed as "superstitious" and "ignorant" by those of the same "liberal" ilk as Fr. McBrien... and so they become associated with "Traddy"ness...

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